EU invests €79 million for gas and electricity projects in Central Europe

EU invests €79 million for gas and electricity projects in Central Europe

Nine out of 17 selected electricity and gas projects for EU funding are from Central and Eastern Europe, for a total value of €79 million out of €873 million. The EU funding for the chosen projects comes from the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF), the European support programme for trans-European infrastructure. In the electricity sector in Central Europe, a grant of €27 million will be allocated to support the construction of a new 400 kV internal power line between Cernavoda and Stalpu (RO), which will contribute to increase the interconnection capacity between Romania and Bulgaria and help integrate wind power from the Black Sea coast. The Commission will also invest in studies to support the synchronisation of the Baltics States. Today's decision is of key importance for Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania and Poland to agree on the way forward to find, by the end of May 2018 at the latest, a solution on the best way to synchronise the Baltic States' electricity grid with the continental Europe system, in line with the results of the ministerial meeting from December 2017 (see STATEMENT/17/5271). In the gas sector, €33 million will fund the preparatory works for the Baltic Pipe Project up to obtainment of all necessary permission(s) in Poland and in Denmark. Some other €16 million will go for the works on the LNG Evacuation Gas Pipeline Omisalj-Zlobin-Bosiljevo-Sisak-Kozarac-Slobodnica in Croatia. Of the 17 projects selected for funding: 8 are in the electricity sector (EU support €680 million) and nine in the gas sector (EU support €193 million). four relate to construction works (EU support €723 million) and 13 to studies (EU support €150 million). The latest PCI list was published by the Commission in [...]
Infrastructure is central to all of our energy objectives

Infrastructure is central to all of our energy objectives

“The development of infrastructure networks is essential to complete European integration and in particular to better connect economies of Central Europe with the rest of the European Union,” Dominique Ristori, Director General at the European Commission, DG Energy, wrote in an exclusive message to CEEP members." One of the priorities of the Juncker Commission is the creation of a resilient European Energy Union with a forward looking climate change policy. In February 2015 the European Commission presented the Energy Union Strategy with a full list of actions to be taken over the next five years. The fundamental goal of the Energy Union is to ensure that the EU consumers - businesses and citizens – will have access to secure, sustainable, competitive and affordable energy. Infrastructure is central to all of our energy objectives. This is the case for energy security, or to provide affordable energy to all or to meet our renewable energy targets. That is why modern energy infrastructure and interconnections are a key element of this strategy. To upgrade Europe's infrastructure, it has been estimated that around €200 billion is needed during the current decade for transmission grids and gas pipelines. Not all investments are commercially viable however and the market alone is likely to only provide half of the necessary investment. The development of infrastructure networks is essential to complete European integration and in particular to better connect economies of Central Europe with the rest of the European Union. The large scale infrastructure projects needed in Europe can only be achieved through better cross-border cooperation. To implement the Energy Union, it will be essential to ensure [...]
The European steel sector in a crisis: from ambition to absurdity in the labyrinth of reforms

The European steel sector in a crisis: from ambition to absurdity in the labyrinth of reforms

The reform of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), which is to take place in the next decade, will mean only a deepening of the current problems for the steel sector throughout the European Union. An unrealistic ambition "Ambitious" is a special word for the European Union’s climate policy. Not only due to its declension in the EU’s documents, but also, because it usually stands for "unrealistic". For over 20 years, the EU concept to create the most environmentally-friendly economy in the world has not changed, and assumes that building its position will be based on more and more abstract goals to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The EU does not see that the global climate summit in Paris restored the two-pillar format, which is the only scientifically legitimate, way of thinking about the protection of the atmosphere. In Paris, it was agreed that the necessary actions would involve both the reduction of emissions, as well as the natural absorption of CO2. Meanwhile, the EU's climate policy obsessively focuses on solutions of the first group. As a result, the pace at which the EU is running for the title of ‘green leader’ turns out to be truly lethal, and European industry becomes its main victim. The British warning The European producers operating in the energy-intensive industries have long since come to terms with the idea that the increase in costs, associated with restrictive climate policy, will not allow them to become global leaders in this industry. The data leaves no illusions: between 1995 and 2015, industrialisation shifted from Europe to the United States and Asia, whilst global emissions increased during [...]
CEEP: The European fertilizer sector seriously endangered by the EU Emissions Trading System

CEEP: The European fertilizer sector seriously endangered by the EU Emissions Trading System

The European Commission is working on a revision of the EU emissions trading system for the period after 2020. Central Europe Energy Partners (CEEP) and Fertilizers Europe call for a better targeting on those sectors that are most exposed to carbon leakage risk, so they can continue to increase production and jobs in Europe. The emissions trading system (ETS) is the EU’s main tool to address climate change and reach its target of a 40% reduction of carbon emissions by 2030. The system is widely criticised by the industry, as paying for emission allowances makes them lower their global competitiveness. Yet, some emissions are allocated for free to those industries, which otherwise could move their production out of Europe to countries or regions with less ambitious climate measures. “The risk of carbon leakage varies greatly between different sectors, and the fertilizer industry is one of the most exposed to that threat. We see at least 100,000 jobs, concerning this industry, in the whole European Union seriously endangered by the process of carbon and investment leakage, which, in turn, are generated by the ETS mechanisms,” said Marcin Bodio, CEO of CEEP, at a debate on the ETS reforms, which was organised in the European Parliament. “This industry plays the important role in the EU’s economic growth and its food security, as half of the food consumed today can be produced due to the use of fertilizers. CEEP, alongside other industry organisations, such as Fertilizers Europe, points out that, as a result of specific technological situations, a proper targeting or differentiation of the ETS system is highly needed. “As two-thirds of [...]
CEEP PositionPaper on the proposalon occupational exposure limits for nitrogen monoxide (NO)

CEEP PositionPaper on the proposalon occupational exposure limits for nitrogen monoxide (NO)

The position of Central Europe Energy Partners (CEEP) regarding the European Union’s proposal to decrease the highest admissible level of nitrogen oxide concentration to 2,5 mg/m³ (2 ppm) is not applicable to underground mining in European Union, where this level is much higher in many Member States whereas in some leading countries is currently set at 5,0 mg/m3 (according  to the legal regulations for underground mining). As a result, we feel obliged to express a critical position regarding the presented proposals of the highest admissible levels of occupational exposure. The proposed level by the European Commission is not acceptable, due to the lack of sufficient scientific,  social, and economic impact research on the implementation of the planned regulations. In the mining sector, despite the use of the most advanced machinery and equipment , technologies, and best practices in the field of NO emissions reduction, it is currently impossible to ensure compliance with the norms which are recommended by the Scientific Committee on Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL). Furthermore, the level of the highest admissible concentration of hazardous agents, is determined for an eight-hour working day, and for the entire period of professional activity. The actual time of exposure of the mining employees to these agents, throughout the day, is lower than that which is established in the eight-hour norm, and it totals: for those employees who are employed on regular 7.5-hour shifts – about 5 hours, for those employees who are employed on reduced 6-hour shifts – about 4 hours. The duration of professional activity of those employees who work underground on regular shifts is limited in many Member States [...]