CEEP and FuelsEurope workshop dedicated to the EU ETS Reform

CEEP and FuelsEurope workshop dedicated to the EU ETS Reform

On the 22nd of April, thanks to the courtesy of the Chairman of the ITRE Committee, Mr. Jerzy Buzek, CEEP and FuelsEurope had an opportunity, in the premises of the European Parliament, to organise a workshop dedicated to the European Union’s Emissions Trading System (ETS) Reform. The meeting was directed especially at the Assistants and Advisors to the Members of the European Parliament. During the meeting, CEEP and FuelsEurope were able to express their opinions regarding ETS reform. As for industry, this issue has become one of the key proposals being now discussed. So, both organisers decided to focus on the – Myths and Reality behind the ETS system, in order to explain its actual position within the European Union’s Climate policy. The event was moderated together, by Mr. Alessandro Bartelloni, Policy Director, FuelsEurope, and Jakub Przyborowicz, Co-ordinator, European Institutions’ Affairs, CEEP.  After they explained to the audience who they represent, and gave some background as to the type of interest group they constitute, they then outlined the positions of both organisations in the current discussions and policies regarding the future formula and shape of the Energy Union. Mr. Bogdan Janicki, Senior Adviser, CEEP, delivered the core presentation, commenting on the EU ETS reforms from the Central European point of view.  Many questions were raised regarding differences between the EU-17 and EU-11 Member States. At the heart of his presentation was the issue of counting CO2 emissions per capita, which gives the real state of play within European Climate policy, and a fairer understanding of ETS as such. He underlined that concept of CO2 storage by forests, should be [...]
The importance of joint lobbying

The importance of joint lobbying

Hungary, along with many other countries in Central Europe, has had high hopes with regards to the functioning of the European markets, and joining the European Union. The same applies in the case of the field of energy. The expectations also had somewhat idealistic elements, such as: achieving levels of infrastructure development typical for Western Europe; reducing the prices of the energy market – based on ‘the market solves everything’ approach; and with the help of competitiveness, within a lifetime, the quality of living for Central European people would catch up and match the levels seen in the developed countries of the EU. These expectations were far too idealistic, with most people believing that all the good shall just ’fall into their laps’ without ever having to do anything for it, or very little, as they expected the EU to come to their aid. After the change of the Hungarian political regime, the economic realities bit deeply, providing a couple of unexpected and bitter experiences for the Hungarian energy market and national consumers. As a result of the privatisation process, whole industries disappeared in the 90’s, only to re-emerge in new European guises, with their products being sold at much higher prices. In the meantime, unemployment rates increased, slowly (and in some places, not so slowly) impoverishment spread, and inflation was hard to contain. Electricity companies also fell prey to privatisation, as the vulnerable state guaranteed extra profits for the owners of these companies, which not only did not cause a drop in prices, but further increased the costs for end-consumers. This was the situation at the end of [...]