Rafał Miland: “Our priority, fostering the integration of the energy sector in Central Europe”

Rafał Miland: “Our priority, fostering the integration of the energy sector in Central Europe”

Cristina Dascălu (CD): What are the priorities you will promote in Brussels, as a Vice-President of the Board of Directors of CEEP, and in regard to energy infrastructure in Central Europe? Rafał Miland (RM): The entire Board of Directors of CEEP and myself, are currently facing a very important challenge - to properly implement the basic objectives behind the foundation of the organisation - namely, fostering the integration processes of the energy sector in Central Europe, within the common policy framework of the European Union, which are rightly associated with ensuring security and diversification of supply within the sector in question. As the Vice-President of the Board of Directors of CEEP, I would like, in particular, to focus on three matters that are especially close to my heart as Vice-President of the Management Board of PERN S.A. Firstly, the development of storage infrastructure, and, above all, facilities designed for maintaining maximum stocks to improve the resistance of the EU to market fluctuations, as well as interruptions in the supply of crude oil and petrochemical products. Secondly, on the provision of EU assets for the construction of oil infrastructure, and thirdly - on the diversification of supply to improve the EU’s independence and resistance to market disturbances. CD: From your professional experience, to what extent is energy policy shaping our future energy system? RM: In my professional career, up till now, whether in Ministries or companies, I frequently observed the significant influence exerted by energy policy upon the future of our power system. The assumptions underlying energy policy, legal regulations, and financial support to selected areas, are of decisive importance, [...]
COP-21: Central Europe satisfied with Paris results

COP-21: Central Europe satisfied with Paris results

The COP-21 climate summit in Paris resulted in an important and fair compromise. All references to decarbonisation were removed from the landmark deal. Instead, a clause on protecting forests was included. This powerful contribution from the Polish delegation proves that climate and economic goals may be achieved, if based on a reasonable balance between carbon output and emission absorption. Central European states delegations made considerable and widely appreciated impact on COP-21 proceedings. That refers particularly to Poland - the region’s largest player. Prime Minister Beata Szydło and Jan Szyszko Minister for Environment arrived in Paris well-armed with facts and figures and willing to defend its energy sector and energy-intensive industry. The two strategic aims were clearly defined. The first one was to reach a truly global, rather than regional agreement. It was obvious that failure to work out a universal compromise would be dangerous for the European Union. Although EU member states are responsible for only 11% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions, they take the lead in their reduction. It is a heavy burden which results in the competitiveness of the European economy continuously falling. [Tweet "It is the transparency of data that Central Europe Energy Partners has been calling for ahead of COP-21"]The other goal was to make sure that, general as the final agreement should be, it would allow each nation to protect its specific interests. This was not a question of a symbolic gesture, but a factor that may have a fundamental meaning for defining individual environmental burdens and policies in the forthcoming years. This is especially important, as in the past decade, the global debate [...]
Rafał Trzaskowski: “We have changed the way of thinking about energy in the EU”

Rafał Trzaskowski: “We have changed the way of thinking about energy in the EU”

For Poland, is the Energy Union Package a success? It is a success, no doubt about that! We have managed to change the way of thinking about energy security in the European Union. I believe there is no way back to the situation where energy was being treated purely from the perspective of national interests, away from climate and economic challenges. We did succeed in placing energy on the right track , where the EU’s common, strategic, geopolitical goals matter more than regional aspirations and where external energy suppliers cannot play us against each other, in line with a ‘divide and rule’ strategy. . This long-term change in the EU’s philosophy is as important as practical legislative proposals. Almost all the solutions from the original proposal by Donald Tusk, the then Prime Minister of Poland, are now in the Energy Union Package. All agreements, commercial ones too, will have to be transparent, which means: fully compliant with EU law and EU energy security provisions, without prejudice to the confidentiality of commercially sensitive information. That is a Copernican shift to what we have at the moment. The Commission will be finally able to verify whether EU laws and energy policies are being obeyed. It is very important that it also concerns the EU’s policies, as some contracts do not explicitly break the EU laws, but go against the philosophy of the single market. Also, collective purchasing will be possible, in line with EU competition law and WTO rules, although it will not be compulsory. Is Poland planning to build an inter-governmental platform for such collective purchasing of gas? [Tweet "So [...]
Poland’s largest photovoltaic farm launched in Gdańsk

Poland’s largest photovoltaic farm launched in Gdańsk

Energa S.A. has just completed the construction of a photovoltaic farm just outside of Gdańsk and Przejazdowo, using 6,292 panels with a total capacity of 1.636 MWp, taking up an area the equivalent of three football fields (25,000 square metres). It is estimated that their production will be able to meet the electricity demand of more than 700 households. Investment for the farm - Poland’s largest – cost PLN 9.5 million, and the construction and assembly lasted two months, with the photovoltaic farm expanding the installed RES capacity in the Group’s power plants by approx. 0.5%. The firm also plans to build a photovoltaic farm in the Kujawsko-Pomorski region with a capacity of about 4MW. Solar power is an addition to Energa’s mix of renewable sources, which include; hydro, wind, and biomass; however, it still represents only a small percentage of the RES capacity installed in Poland, which totals nearly 6,000 MW. Mirosław Bieliński, CEO of Energa S.A. declared the photovoltaic farm in Gdańsk to be “an experimental investment”, but noted that: “photovoltaic technologies are growing less expensive at the fastest pace possible across the globe, and that is why Energa do not exclude larger-scale photovoltaic investments in the future.” Picture: Energa S.A. - Photovoltaic farm in Gdańsk [...]